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P51 starts weekly community gardening sessions with Coral Ris residents!

Updated: 6 days ago

LOT Pasir Ris 51 has started a community gardening project in collaboration with the Coral Ris Residents Committee (RC), aiming to provide a valuable outdoor learning experience for our children. One session will be held every Thursday from 9-10am, with the K1s and K2s taking turns every alternate week. They were thrilled to launch the first two sessions at the end of May!


The children were a little shy at the beginning and took some warming up to interact with the seniors. However, all tensions disappeared when they were introduced to the koi pond and were instructed to feed the fish! The K1s got to know more about the varied plants in the garden and the aunties and uncles from the RC taught how to plant seeds, water them and also how to harvest sweet potato tops. One tip they learnt was that newly planted seeds cannot be watered too frequently. The K2 children enjoyed participating and being a part of the community through planting different seeds in the soil provided. They were each given a small pot as well to plant either tomato or chilli. Furthermore, the walks in the garden also allowed them to discover common fruits and vegetables they know.



Some challenges faced would be the hot and sweltering weather, as well as the presence of mosquitoes. Although uncomfortable, the children still enjoyed the experience nonetheless. A few children also had to be constantly reminded not to touch certain things in the garden in order not to damage them or hurt themselves. As the weeks go by, the children will hopefully get used to the conditions and be able to comply to the rules so that they can get the best out of these gardening sessions!


Conversations overheard while a senior was teaching about the various parts of a plant and the children quickly identified the parts: Senior: Wow, you are all so clever, did your teacher teach you about plants? Child: No, we learnt about them by ourselves. We are very smart. Senior (looks to teacher): Children learn so fast these days. (looks back at children) Do you know what each part of the plant does? Child: No, can you tell us?

In the weeks following their first session, some children also grew impatient as they yearned to see the results of their plants growing or blossoming as some did not even shoot up due to the recent harsh weather. They are still learning to wait graciously.

“Such activities are important because it teaches the children on connecting with nature, fostering appreciation for the environment, learning about plants and other living things as well as how to take care of them. Involving various generations of people also teaches sustainability and co-operation, and it gives awareness to the children that no matter how old or young you are, you can help and contribute to the community by doing activities such as planting and taking care of plants,” shared Ms Oledan Christian Merro, English Preschool Teacher (P51).  


"Seniors sometimes can take it as that they have nothing left to offer, however, their knowledge in life shows otherwise. Children are sometimes taught that they are too young to offer anything, but being a teacher, I have learnt so much from them."


Teacher Luke Tan also expressed, "Intergenerational interactions are essential to stay connected with both young and old. The exchange of information can be heart warming and useful to each other. Seniors sometimes can take it as that they have nothing left to offer, however, their knowledge in life shows otherwise. Children are sometimes taught that they are too young to offer anything, but being a teacher, I have learnt so much from them."












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